Untitled

“I said to Viggo, ‘I’m gonna put the camera down the hillside a little bit. Can you try to kick the helmet close to the lens? Because it will look great if it just flies past us.’”

omg this. every day, this.

omg this. every day, this.

oh…….. *handmotions*

oh…….. *handmotions*

boemina:

eldunariliduen:

dilutedxwater:

Just sitting there in the goodwill….



WOAH

O.o!!!!

boemina:

eldunariliduen:

dilutedxwater:

Just sitting there in the goodwill….

image

WOAH

O.o!!!!

sassytonystarkandsamurott:

shuraiya:



Sir Ian McKellen, on whether he prefers Legolas or Aragorn


SCREAMS UNCONTROLLABLY

throws self off cliff screaming

oh my….

sassytonystarkandsamurott:

shuraiya:

Sir Ian McKellen, on whether he prefers Legolas or Aragorn

SCREAMS UNCONTROLLABLY

throws self off cliff screaming

oh my….

toddlersandtattoos:

This will always be my favorite gifset purely for the accuracy.

Hahahahha omg yes

coolchicksfromhistory:

smithsonian:

Postcard from Woman Suffrage Parade, 1913
On March 3, 1913, 5,000 women marched up Pennsylvania Avenue demanding the right to vote. Their “national procession,” staged the day before Woodrow Wilson’s presidential inauguration, was the first civil rights parade to use the nation’s capital as a backdrop, underscoring the national importance of their cause and women’s identity as American citizens.
The event brought women from around the country to Washington in a show of strength and determination to obtain the ballot. The extravagant parade—and the near riot that almost destroyed it—kept woman suffrage in the newspapers for weeks.
“The National Woman Suffrage Parade, 1913” display recreates the mood of the parade and illustrates its impact using costumes worn by participants along with banners, sashes, letters, photographs and postcards like the one shown here. 

A few days late for the 100th anniversary, but I’m putting together a series of posts about the 1913 parade.  If you’re interested, you might want to track the tag March 13 1913.  And if you’re in DC, you can check out the artifact wall at the Museum of American History (check out the link above).

coolchicksfromhistory:

smithsonian:

Postcard from Woman Suffrage Parade, 1913

On March 3, 1913, 5,000 women marched up Pennsylvania Avenue demanding the right to vote. Their “national procession,” staged the day before Woodrow Wilson’s presidential inauguration, was the first civil rights parade to use the nation’s capital as a backdrop, underscoring the national importance of their cause and women’s identity as American citizens.

The event brought women from around the country to Washington in a show of strength and determination to obtain the ballot. The extravagant parade—and the near riot that almost destroyed it—kept woman suffrage in the newspapers for weeks.

“The National Woman Suffrage Parade, 1913” display recreates the mood of the parade and illustrates its impact using costumes worn by participants along with banners, sashes, letters, photographs and postcards like the one shown here

A few days late for the 100th anniversary, but I’m putting together a series of posts about the 1913 parade.  If you’re interested, you might want to track the tag March 13 1913.  And if you’re in DC, you can check out the artifact wall at the Museum of American History (check out the link above).

love love love love love :)

nwkarchivist:

“Look around.  It’s happening everywhere.  More and more people every day are listening to music in a revolutionary way…”
Newsweek 1981

nwkarchivist:

“Look around.  It’s happening everywhere.  More and more people every day are listening to music in a revolutionary way…”

Newsweek 1981

I love his brand of nerdy-ness :)